2016 Vermont’s Greenest Building Awards: Residential – Dinnan/Webster Resident (left) and Commercial – Hartford Town Call (right)

The Vermont Green Building Network (VGBN) recognized the most energy efficient buildings in Vermont at the Vermont Green Building Gala, held at Main Street Landing on March 30, 2017.VGBN’s Vermont’s Greenest Building Awards are a statewide competition that honors residential and commercial buildings that meet the highest standard of demonstrated building energy performance.

The 2016 Vermont’s Greenest Residential Building was awarded to the Dinnan/Webster Residence designed and built by Fiddlehead Construction. This new single-family residence on the south slope of Mt. Philo in Charlotte reused a previously developed lot. The home was designed to be net-zero energy ready (this means it can meet all of its annual energy needs with renewable energy). This inspiring home won with a proven annual energy intensity of eight kBtu/sf/yr. This home consumes only 16% of the average consumption of a New England home (50 kBtu/sf/yr). Fiddlehead Construction used natural, durable materials for the home to increase longevity including salvaged sinks, boneyard slate and local maple counters. The home is an all electric home with a supplemental woodstove for heat and ambiance.

The 2016 Vermont’s Greenest Commercial Building was awarded to Hartford Town Hall designed and built by Bread Loaf Corporation. The Hartford Town Hall, originally built as a school in 1895, was converted to Town Office in 1956. After years of deferred maintenance and minor remodeling efforts, the Town selected Bread Loaf Corporation to provide design and construction services for complete renovation of the existing facility. This net-zero ready building is consuming only 24% of the energy used by the average commercial building in New England (86 kBtu/sf/yr). The Hartford Town Hall is using only 21 kBtu/sf/yr.

The 2016 Vermont’s Greener Residential Building award was presented to Mills 21st Century Farmhouse designed by Albert, Righter & Tittmann (ART) Architects from Boston, Massachusetts. This super insulated, passive solar Greek revival farmhouse won with a proven annual energy intensity of 13.76 kBtu/sf/yr. This home consumes only 27% of the average consumption of a New England home (50 kBtu/sf/yr). Coupled with a 5.8 kW array from SunCommon, this south facing home is close to net zero.

The 2016 Vermont’s Going Green Residential Building was awarded to Pleasants Home designed and built by VERMOD. This high performance modular home uses about 44% of the average consumption of a New England home (50 kBtu/sf/yr). All construction for this project occurred under factory-controlled conditions and included great attention to air sealing details. A six kW PV array complement the high performance envelope to bring the home close to net zero energy usage. This project was also awarded the 2016 People’s Choice Award voted by Gala attendees.

The 2016 Going Green Commercial Building awards were given to Middlebury College’s 3 South Street designed by Smith Alvarez Sienkiewtcz (SAS) Architects and Vermont Land Trust Headquarters submitted by Maclay Architects. The mixed-use Middlebury College 3 South Street building involved renovation and restoration of a historic building with extensive consideration for sustainable design. This LEED Platinum project uses about 30% of the average commercial building in New England (86 kBtu/sf/yr). The Vermont Land Trust began working with the Maclay Architects design team to develop a redesign of their headquarters that included preserving the buildings historic character, ensuring occupant health, and promoting energy conservation. This building now uses about 35% of the average commercial building in New England (86 kBtu/sf/yr).